Czech Republic Student Visa

Czech Republic Student Visa

Czech Republic Student Visa

OVERVIEWEDUCATIONWHY CHOOSE CZECH REPUBLIC TO STUDY ?EDUCATION SYSTEMEDUCATION INSTITUTIONSAPPLICATION PROCEDUREVISA PROCEDURECOST OF EDUCATION AND LIVINGPOST STUDY WORKFAQ’S
Capital : Prague.

Languages : Slavic, English, German. Spanish.

Official Currency : Czech Koruna (CZK).

Major Cities : Pargue, Brno, Ostrava, Pilsen, Liberec.

Czech Republic at Glance

The Czech Republic is a landlocked country in the middle of Europe. Rather than as a country in the middle of Europe, we should speak of the Czech Republic as a Country in the heart of Europe. The official language of Czech Republic is Czech. Czech belongs to the Indo-European family of languages. The Slavonic languages are divided into the eastern, western and southern branches. Czech belongs to the western Slavonic family, along with Slovak, Polish and Wendish. The Czechs and Slovaks understand each other without major problems. Czech has a difficult grammatical structure but reading and pronunciation are fairly easy.

For more details please visit : Czech Republic

Geography

The Czech Republic’s central European landscape is dominated by the Bohemian Massif, which rises to heights of 3,000 ft (900 m) above sea level. This ring of mountains encircles a large elevated basin, the Bohemian Plateau. The principal rivers are the Elbe and the Vltava.

Czech Republic stretches along a total area of 79,000 square kilometers. The Geography of Czech Republic is marked by a terrain which is very diverse and includes plateau, highlands as well as lowlands. Krkonose meaning Giant Mountains is the highest mountain in the Czech Republic and the other important mountain ranges are Hruby Jesenik which means Ash Montains, the Beskydy Mountains and the Sumava mountain range. Rivers are an integral part of the Geography of Czech Republic and voluminous rivers like Vltava, Elbe, Morava, and Oder flow through the country.

For detailed information please visit : Geography of Czech Republic.

Climate

Prague has a marine west coast climate and as such experiences rain all year round. Prague also experiences four distinct seasons of spring, summer, autumn and winter. Though there is a difference between the amount of rainfall for each month on average, the number of days that it rains per month is fairly consistent with around 12 days experiencing rain every month.

Summer :-

Summer comes to Prague in June and ends in August. The average temperature high ranges between 20 degrees Celsius and 23 degrees Celsius with night time lows that average
between 10 and 11 degrees Celsius.

Autumn :-

rague experiences autumn during September, October and November. The temperatures drop away quickly from the summer highs to 19 degrees Celsius average high in September to an average high of 7 degrees Celsius during November. The rain experienced in the summer drops to around half with roughly 40mm of rain falling in each of the autumn months on average.

Winter:-

December, January and February are the winter months in Prague. The temperatures drop to their coldest point at this time and during January they are at their lowest. The temperatures range from an average high of 2 degrees Celsius to 0 degrees Celsius and temperatures can drop down to as low as -5 degrees Celsius on average during January. Rain fall is at its lowest during the winter months with around 25mm of rain falling in each month of winter.

Spring :-

Spring tends to come to Prague between March and May. The temperatures rise rapidly from the winter lows as spring pass with an average high of 7 degrees Celsius in March toa high of 18 degrees Celsius in May. The nights still remain fairly cool though with the temperature ranging between an average low of -1 degree Celsius in March to 8 degrees Celsius in May. The rain in March and April stays between 20mm and 40mm on average but in May the rains peak with around 80mm of rain falling making it the wettest month of the year in Prague.

Reference : Climate of Czech Republic

Culture

Czech Republic culture has held true through centuries of change.Whether it be government changes, war or protest, the hearts of Czechs have held fast to their values, traditions and interests.

Family is a key element of Czech Republic culture and is generally placed ahead of work. Traditional families are quite the norm with mothers cooking and raising the children while fathers work. It’s common to see fathers pushing strollers on the weekend giving mom a break.

Czech holidays are a great barometer of Czech Republic culture. Czechs celebrate many standard holidays but with their own spin.And, there are numerous traditional celebrations throughout the year as well. There is a long history here of marking the seasons with different festivities and characters.

Czechs are mad about football (soccer) and hockey. The national teams for both sports are well respected worldwide and always have a huge following locally. Each sport also has popular domestic leagues.

For further information, please visit Culture of Czech Republic

Food

Over the course of the centuries, Czech cuisine has been exposed to influences from its neighboring countries. As a result, the Austrian, Hungarian,Czech and German cuisines feature a number of common dishes. These include, for example, goulash, Wiener schnitzel and gnocchi.

Traditional Czech cuisine is distinguished by a large variety of dishes, and an impressive array of flavors. It also features the wide use of lean and fat-streaked pork, along with a rich choice of meals and side dishes prepared from flour. A most prominent dish made from flour is dumplings, a unique phenomenon of Czech cuisine.

At one time, dumplings formed the basic component of Czech fare, as they were served with a variety of tasty sauces to satisfy the hunger of hard-working peasants, who only enjoyed meat during holidays. In addition, Czech creativity has contributed to the development of a variety of dishes prepared from potatoes. Sauces play quite the role in Czech cooking, as they form a vital part of meals, especially in combination with meat and the aforementioned dumplings. Another characteristic feature of Czech cuisine is the widespread use of cabbage (sauerkraut). Prepared in several ways, cabbage is served warm as a side dish to a large number of meals.

For further information, please visit Cuisine of Czech Republic

Considered one of the most beautiful countries in Eastern Europe, the Czech Republic was formed at the start of 1993, having formerly been part of Czechoslovakia. Previously a communist state under the influence of the Soviet Union for the four decades following World War II, it’s rapidly developed into an advanced economy. In 2006, it became the first former Eastern Bloc state to achieve “developed country” status, according to the World Bank.

Today, the Czech Republic is an increasingly popular destination for international study, with almost 400,000 foreign students currently enrolled here. EU statistics released in 2014 listed it as the 12th most popular destination for Erasmus students in Europe. There are certainly many perks for those choosing to study in the Czech Republic: well-esteemed universities, affordable tuition fees and living costs, and last but not least, a vibrant and colorful cultural life.

For further detailed information please visit Study in Czech Republic

Primary Education:-

Education in the Czech Republic is compulsory from age 6 to age 15, and the first phase of this takes place at primary school. The curriculum is general academic. At the end of the period a primary school leaving certificate is awarded.

Middle Education:-

The second and final phase of basic school education takes place at general school or gymnasium which takes a further 4 years. The general academic curriculum continues. Upon completion a vysvědčení certificate is awarded.

Secondary education:-

There are 2 main types of secondary schools in the Czech Republic, namely general and technical ones. The 1st category prepares students for university education. The 2nd is more technically focused. Both 6 year programs complete with amaturitní zkouška / maturita.

Vocational Education:-

As an alternative, students may attend secondary vocational / technical school instead for 3 to 4 years, where they may acquire specific professional skills. Depending on the nature of the program, they may be rewarded with a výuční list, after 3 years, or a vysvědčení o maturitní zkoušce after 4.

Teritary Education:-

There are 3 tiers of tertiary education available in the Czech Republic. These are professional schools providing diplomas, non-university higher education institutions presenting undergraduate courses, and research universities educating through to doctoral level.

Charles University in Prague is by far the oldest and most venerable, having been founded in 1348 as the first university in Central Europe. Its faculties include theology, law, medicine, arts & philosophy, science, mathematics & physics, education, social sciences, humanities, and physical education & sport.

Reference : Education System in Czech Republic

Intake

Application deadlines for studies at university or college in the Czech Republic vary greatly depending on the institution and the study program. In general, students are required to submit their applications in the semester preceding the one in which you intend to study the selected course/program.

  • In the Czech Republic, the academic year is divided into 2 semesters: the winter and summer semesters.

Entry Requirement

Undergraduate studies (first cycle)

If you have successfully completed upper secondary studies in one of the signatory countries of the Lisbon Convention, are in possession of a valid school leaving certificate and qualify for higher education studies in your home country, you may also qualify for higher education studies in the Czech Republic. However, you are requested to prove your level of Czech language and/or English or other foreign language depending on the language of instruction of your course/study program. In some cases, you are also requested to take additional qualifying courses and even pass admission tests.

Master’s studies (second cycle)

If you are applying for a master’s program at a higher education institution in the Czech Republic, you are required to be in possession of a relevant bachelor’s or equivalent degree diploma.

PhD studies (third cycle)

In the event you are applying for doctoral studies at an institution in the Czech Republic, you are required to be in possession of a relevant diploma or master’s degree program.

English and other foreign languages :-

If your study program or course is taught in English or any other foreign language, you will be required to prove your level of command of the foreign language. Please, always check with your university whether your foreign language studies are sufficient for you to meet this requirement.

For more details on IELTS, please visit British Council IELTS

and IDP British Council
Required Documents

  • Passport copy
  • Photograph
  • Proof of accommodation
  • Proof of Fund
  • Confirmation Letter Of study.
  • Medical Insurance
  • Resume/CV
  • IELTS Score Sheet (If have)
  • All academic and work experience documents
  • Statement of Purpose

For detailed visa application checklist, Please speak to our counselor. www.yourwaymigrations.com or e-mail us at info@yourwaymigrations.com

For detailed visa application checklist, Please speak to our counselor. www.yourwaymigrations.com or e-mail us at info@yourwaymigrations.com
Please visit visa Procedure of Czech republic or Czech republic High Commision – New Delhi for detailed information on Visa procedure.

All international students can study under the same conditions as the Czech ones. Studying in Czech language at public and state institutions of higher education is free of charge. Public institutions of higher education are entitled to charge tuition fees for studies in programmes where the language of instruction is other than Czech. It varies according to university and field of study. Individual faculties charge from 2 000-12 000 USD/year.

The cost of living is approximately USD $ 350 to 750 per Month, this covers all the living expenses, including accommodation, food, travel, books, clothes and entertainment.

For other detailed expense, please check Living Cost in Czech Republic

During your studies

If you are a citizen from a non-EU country and you want to work while you study, it is possible, but as you are in the Czech Republic with a study visa, paid work cannot be your primary occupation during your stay. Remember, you are here for study purposes. You should not assume that you can pay for your studies with a part-time job that you find in Prague. A typical Hourly rate for student job strange from CZK 1 for basic administrative work.

Full-time students at a university registered with the Ministry of Education, Youth and Sports (e.g. CTU) only need to be registered at the Public Employment Office (Úřad Práce). This registration is made by the employer.

Reference: Work During study

After your studies (Work and Migration)

Foreigners in the Czech Republic are required to comply with the purpose of their stay. If you have a residence permit for study purposes, it is necessary to have the status of a a student. If you terminate or complete your studies, you should not remain in the Czech Republic. If you find a job, you can change your purpose of stay. After graduating, foreign students with a CTU degree have direct access to the labour market in the Czech Republic

Reference: Employment After Study

How will Yourway Migrations Pvt. Ltd Help Me?

Yourway Migrations has been sending students to Czech Republic and other countries since 7 years. YMPL has trained counselors who have got experience and expertise to assist students. All our offices provides students with

  • Counseling and information on various courses and institutions
  • Application forms – Brochures – Guides etc.
  • Admission Assistance
  • Visa Counseling
  • Travel and Accommodation arrangement assistance
  • Procuring Residential Facilities with Indians for students going abroad
  • Giving Orientation kit.

Please visit www.yourwaymigrations.com

Can I work while I am studying?

If you are a citizen from a non-EU country and you want to work while you study, it is possible, but as you are in the Czech Republic with a study visa, paid work cannot be your primary occupation during your stay. Remember, you are here for study purposes. You should not assume that you can pay for your studies with a part-time job that you find in Prague. A typical Hourly rate for student job stranges from CZK 1 for basic administrative work.
Full-time students at a university registered with the Ministry of Education, Youth and Sports (e.g. CTU) only need to be registered at the Public Employment Office (Úřad Práce). This registration is made by the employer.

Do I need an English language certificate if my whole previous education was in English?

No. If your previous education was taught in English and your school leaving certificate indicates this, you will not have to provide an English language certificate.

Does the university offer accommodation?
Yes, University Offers Accommodation.
Do I have to travel to Prague for entrance exams?

Only applicants for Civil Engineering, Nuclear Sciences and for doctoral studies are required to travel to Prague for an entrance exam.

How long can I stay in the Czch Republic after completing my study programme?

Foreigners in the Czech Republic are required to comply with the purpose of their stay. If you have a residence permit for study purposes, it is necessary to have the status of a a student. If you terminate or complete your studies, you should not remain in the Czech Republic. If you find a job, you can change your purpose of stay. After graduating, foreign students with a CTU degree have direct access to the labour market in the Czech Republic.

What is the weather like in the Czech Republic?

Many students coming from a warmer climate underestimate the local weather conditions. An overcoat is necessary not just in winter but also in early spring and late autumn. In summer, temperatures may fluctuate and you should therefore carry a light jacket just in case. For winter, a wool cap, gloves, scarf, a down jacket and waterproof non-slip shoes are essential. The sun sets early in winter, and the clocks are changed twice a year. The good news is that, even in the winter months, there are on an average 15 sunny days! Many Czechs look forward to winter, and if you are appropriately dressed you too will find Prague under snow very attractive.